Health Catalyst Upcoming Webinar
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Raising the Digital Trajectory of Healthcare

 

Should healthcare be more digitized? Absolutely. But if we go about it the wrong way... or the naïve way... we will take two steps forward and three steps back.

Wednesday, August 15
1:00-2:30 PM EST

Join Dale Sanders for a 90-minute webinar in which he will describe the right way to go about the technical digitization of healthcare so that it increases the sense of humanity during the journey.

The topics he’ll cover include:

  • The human, empathetic components of healthcare’s digitization strategy
  • The AI-enabled healthcare encounter in the near future
  • Why the current digital approach to patient engagement will never be effective
  • The dramatic near-term potential of bio-integrated sensors
  • Role of the “digitician” and patient data profiles
  • The technology and architecture of a modern digital platform
  • The role of AI vs. the role of traditional data analysis in healthcare
  • Reasons that home grown digital platforms will not scale, economically

 
Most of the data that’s generated in healthcare is about administrative overhead of healthcare, not about the current state of patients’ well-being. On average, healthcare collects data about patients three times per year from which providers are expected to optimize diagnoses, treatments, predict health risks and cultivate long-term care plans. Where’s the data about patients’ health from the other 362 days per year?
 
McKinsey ranks industries based on their Digital Quotient (DQ), which is derived from a cross product of three areas: Data Assets x Data Skills x Data Utilization. Healthcare ranks lower than all industries except mining. It’s time for healthcare to raise its digital quotient, however, it’s a delicate balance. The current “data-driven” strategy in healthcare is a train wreck, sucking the life out of clinicians’ sense of mastery, autonomy, and purpose.
 
Healthcare’s digital strategy has largely ignored the digitization of patients’ state of health, but that’s changing, and the change will be revolutionary. Driven by bio-integrated sensors and affordable genomics, in the next five years, many patients will possess more data and AI-driven insights about their diagnosis and treatment options than healthcare systems, turning the existing dialogue with care providers on its head. It’s going to happen. Let’s make it happen the right way.

Dale Sanders
Dale Sanders - President of Technology, Health Catalyst

 

Dale has been one of the most influential leaders in healthcare analytics and data warehousing since his earliest days in the industry, starting at Intermountain Healthcare from 1997-2005, where he was the chief architect for the enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and regional director of medical informatics at LDS Hospital.

 

In 2001, he founded the Healthcare Data Warehousing Association. From 2005-2009, he was the CIO for Northwestern University’s physicians’ group and the chief architect of the Northwestern Medical EDW. From 2009-2012, he served as the CIO for the national health system of the Cayman Islands where he helped lead the implementation of new care delivery processes that are now associated with accountable care in the US.

 

Prior to his healthcare experience, Dale had a diverse 14-year career that included duties as a CIO on Looking Glass airborne command posts in the US Air Force; IT support for the Reagan/Gorbachev summits; nuclear threat assessment for the National Security Agency and START Treaty; chief architect for the Intel Corp’s Integrated Logistics Data Warehouse; and co-founder of Information Technology International. As a systems engineer at TRW, Dale and his team developed the largest Oracle data warehouse in the world at that time (1995), using an innovative design principle now known as a late binding architecture.

 

He holds a BS degree in chemistry and minor in biology from Ft. Lewis College, Durango Colorado, and is a graduate of the US Air Force Information Systems Engineering program.