Health Catalyst Upcoming Webinar
register arrow

Register Now

Healthcare Analytics: Right-Brain Advice in a Left-Brain World

 

U.S. healthcare is badly missing the soft, human side of healthcare analytics, especially as it impacts clinicians. How do we fix that? This webinar will explore those ideas.

Wednesday, July 17
1:00-2:00 PM ET

You won’t hear me talk about SQL, inner joins, outer joins, R, Python, logistic regression, random forest, or convolutional neural networks but instead, I’m going to talk about the principles and philosophy of analytics.

For the most part, we’ve figured out the technology of analytics. That is all left-brain thinking—analytical, logical and methodical in nature—and it is literally getting easier every day with new data technology. But, in healthcare, we’re missing the right-brain thinking—creative and artistic in nature—that has almost nothing to do with technology but has everything to do with the human side of pursuing “data driven healthcare.”

Right-brain thinking is required for the oddities and shortcomings of healthcare data, and how to manage those shortcomings in the context of delivering data to the humans who we hope will consume it. The right-brain relates to the personality characteristics of the people who are leading your analytics strategy. It relates to the leadership culture of the organization and where that culture resides on a scale of transparency, internally and externally. The right-brain relates to behavioral economics, evolutionary psychology, human decision making theories, and the fundamental factors that motivate or demotivate human behavior. The right-brain relates to concepts like experimental design and PICO—patients, interventions, comparisons, and outcomes—that, if followed, can make your analytics more truthful and believable. It has to do with the way we negotiate and structure performance-based contracts that are loaded with quality metrics that either measure things that can’t be measured accurately or may measure the wrong thing, altogether.

You see, right-brained thinking in this left-brain world of analytics relates to a bunch of things, but mostly it relates to the Golden Rule of Data. Do unto others with data as you would have them do unto you.

Please join me in the conversation and let’s work together to bring more right-brained thinking into this left-brain world of healthcare analytics.

Dale Sanders
Dale Sanders - Chief Technology Officer, Health Catalyst
 

Dale has been one of the most influential leaders in healthcare analytics and data warehousing since his earliest days in the industry, starting at Intermountain Healthcare from 1997-2005, where he was the chief architect for the enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and regional director of medical informatics at LDS Hospital.

 
In 2001, he founded the Healthcare Data Warehousing Association. From 2005-2009, he was the CIO for Northwestern University’s physicians’ group and the chief architect of the Northwestern Medical EDW. From 2009-2012, he served as the CIO for the national health system of the Cayman Islands where he helped lead the implementation of new care delivery processes that are now associated with accountable care in the US.

 
Prior to his healthcare experience, Dale had a diverse 14-year career that included duties as a CIO on Looking Glass airborne command posts in the US Air Force; IT support for the Reagan/Gorbachev summits; nuclear threat assessment for the National Security Agency and START Treaty; chief architect for the Intel Corp’s Integrated Logistics Data Warehouse; and co-founder of Information Technology International. As a systems engineer at TRW, Dale and his team developed the largest Oracle data warehouse in the world at that time (1995), using an innovative design principle now known as a late binding architecture.

 
He holds a BS degree in chemistry and minor in biology from Ft. Lewis College, Durango Colorado, and is a graduate of the US Air Force Information Systems Engineering program.